What Are the Long-Term Effects of Daily Noopept Usage?

Noopept is a hot nootropic these days, and many people have questions about its use.
 
In general, Noopept is safe and one of the most effective nootropics out there, but many users have nagging concerns about taking Noopept long term. I’d be concerned too if my plan was to add Noopept to my stack for a few months.
 
In this article, I’ll be looking at the evidence we have about Noopept long term effects and tying it together to give you a picture of how and why it may or may not be beneficial for you to have Noopept in your stack for the long haul.

Daily Effects

Noopept starts working within half an hour of oral ingestion, and its metabolites stay in your system for at least a couple of hours.
 
Noopept offers improved recall, faster and clearer thinking, and stronger memory formation as well as learning.
 
Noopept is relatively inexpensive for a nootropic and can be bought from quite a few different suppliers over the counter.
 
The long-term cost of adding Noopept to your stack won’t be very much, even if you’re dosing on the high side.
 
You’ll notice the Noopept come up as it’s absorbing, but likely not the fade out because of how gradual it is.
 
Factors like food, drugs, and other nootropics can interfere with Noopept’s absorption and elimination, so be mindful of when you take it and what with. Some users re-dose after a few hours, but I wouldn’t suggest it.
 
The higher you dose and the more frequently you dose multiple times on the same day, the more likely you are to experience side effects.
 
With Noopept, the side effects are typically quite innocuous symptoms like dry mouth, headache, and anxiety, but there’s no reason to take your chances.
 
Picking a consistent time to dose each day decreases the chance of experiencing negative side effects because it’ll get your body into a rhythm of consistent serum concentration of Noopept’s metabolites.
 
The more inconsistent you are with your dosing schedule, the less consistent the serum metabolite concentration—not a problem if you’re only using Noopept for one-off purposes, but undesirable for the long haul when you’ll have residual metabolites already in your body from prior days.

Monthly Effects

One dose of Noopept can hang around in your system for up to nine days, per a study on its pharmacokinetics.
 
This means that you’ll be getting the anti-amnesic effects of Noopept strongly for the noticeable phase of dosing, and then get a “long tail” as the levels of Noopept metabolites are broken down over the course of the next days.
 
It’s unclear exactly how noticeable this long tail is, but users who make Noopept a part of their daily stack will build up Noopept metabolites to a consistent level throughout each day and experience benefits accordingly.
 
There’s no recorded tolerance or reduction of Noopept effectiveness over time spans as long as a month.
 
A month is a particularly important chunk of time when considering nootropic effectiveness because your brain’s process for consolidating memories—long-term potentiation—takes about that long from the start of the necessary precursor processes to the finish of a pristine long term memory.
 
Long-term potentiation has a lot of the ins and outs, but it’s clear that Noopept affects memory formation positively.
 
There’s no ambiguity about the evidence: Noopept is safe over the course of a month and starts to shine during the tail end of the memory formation process, where its anti-amnestic properties kick in.
 
Noopept is okay at helping you learn things faster, but it’s excellent at preventing you from forgetting the things you already know, and likely benefits from the state dependent memory effect.
 
This means that the more stuff you learn while taking Noopept, the more likely you are to recall it in the future periods when you are also on Noopept—independent of the memory-supportive features of Noopept!

Long Term Effects?

Noopept was originally designed for use in patients with degenerative brain diseases like Alzheimer’s and may have immunostimulatory effects in the brain.
 
It’s unclear whether Noopept can spur the immune system into preventatively policing the plaques responsible for Alzheimer’s, but it’s a possibility.
 
If Noopept can sustain immunostimulation in the long term, it’s probable that it’s healthier to be taking Noopept long term than not to be taking any at all.
 
For users less concerned about preventing Alzheimer’s Noopept still offers a lot over the long term, namely improved recall, improved learning rate, and reduced anxiety.
 
Though it hasn’t been studied yet, I’d put my money on Noopept’s anxiolytic effect petering out over time because the brain’s GABA-ergic arousal systems are especially plastic, and have extremely durable set points which are very difficult to stray from for long.
 
There aren’t any definitive studies on Noopept that examine use over the course of years, but everything we do know indicates that long-term Noopept use is safe, effective, and worthwhile for those seeking a boost to their memory.

Moving Forward

So, to recap: using Noopept is probably safe for the long term, although it hasn’t been studied past a few months of use.
 
Noopept should be as effective for the hundredth time that you use it as the first.
 
You’ll want to take Noopept at a consistent time of day, and in a consistent dose to maintain your serum levels of its metabolites.
 
More research into Noopept will probably shed more light on the safety and efficacy of long-term use, so be sure to keep up with the latest. I’ve had very good results with Noopept over the medium term, but you’ll need to run a trial to be certain.
 
If you’re interested in adding Noopept to your stack as a trial, check out the resources we have here to see if it’s right for you.
Be sure to ask any questions that you have here in the comments, and we’ll try to answer to the best of our ability.


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